365 Days of Hydrangea

365 Days of Hydrangeafeatured

Who doesn’t love a giant blue, pink, white, or purple ball of hydrangea in the summer?  I actually think hydrangea are even better when they start to turn those hues of romantic mauve and lime, kind of like a smudged watercolor painting.  Here in the Willamette Valley in Oregon–that time is now.  Mine are light blue in the summer, due to the natural acidity of our soil.  But this is what they look like now:

Hydrangea

Hydrangea

hydrangea

And now is the time for you to have hydrangea in your home 365 days a year.  The key is to bring them into the house, and dry them.  Bring them inside before they turn brown, like a few of them have done in the below image.hydrangea

I’m generally not a fan of artificial or dried flowers.  But when they look identical to the real and fresh thing, I like them.  In the photo below, can you tell which pile of hydrangea is fresh (cut today) and which were dried last month?  They look pretty much the same!  (pile on the right is dry)DSC_0030

So it’s worth it to dry them, and you can make bouquets in the winter or wreaths or garlands or even decorate your Christmas tree with them.  So many creative choices for you.  I dry them by just placing them in my bath tub and leaving them there for a couple of weeks (obviously, you don’t run any water–it’s just a safe place away from the kids).  Here’s me with a bundle of them before placing them in the tub.DSC_0033

DSC_0034

But now the fun part—let’s make a bouquet with some of the fresh ones!  Hydrangea need a grand vase and a fancy display, because of their sheer size.  I love a tall clear vase.  Mine has ruffles, which actually helps with flower placement.  While hydrangea can stand alone, most bouquets are made more interesting with a minimum of three different textures or flowers.  I added tall verbena (purple) for extra color and stalks of oregano (lime green) which have gone to seed for extra texture.  The reason this bouquet is successful is because it is asymmetrical.  Note how one side is high, and the other drapes over the edge.  This is intentional and makes the display more natural and romantic.  Enjoy!hydrangea, tall verbena, oregano bouquet

hydrangea, tall verbena, oregano bouquet

hydrangea, tall verbena, oregano bouquet

hydrangea, tall verbena, oregano bouquet

hydrangea, tall verbena, oregano bouquet

 

About the author

Stephanie Koski

Stephanie is a retired physician, mother to three boys, and an avid gardener with many hobbies and interests. She lives outside of Salem, Oregon, in the mid-Willamette Valley. Stephanie does all of the photography and writing for this website, and all content is original and copyrighted.

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